BCCG Accountability Report: Independent Auditor’s Report to the members of the Governing Body

BCCG Accountability Report: Independent Auditor’s Report to the members of the Governing Body

Report on the audit of the financial statements

Opinion

We have audited the financial statements of NHS Blackpool Clinical Commissioning Group (“the CCG”) for the year ended 31 March 2021 which comprise the Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure, Statement of Financial Position, Statement of Changes in Taxpayers’ Equity and Statement of Cash Flows, and the related notes, including the accounting policies in note 1.

In our opinion the financial statements:

  • give a true and fair view of the state of the CCG’s affairs as at 31 March 2021 and of its income and expenditure for the year then ended; and
  • have been properly prepared in accordance with the accounting policies directed by NHS England with the consent of the Secretary of State as being relevant to CCGs in England and included in the Department of Health and Social Care Group Accounting Manual 2020/21.

Basis for opinion

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing (UK) (“ISAs (UK)”) and applicable law. Our responsibilities are described below. We have fulfilled our ethical responsibilities under, and are independent of the CCG in accordance with, UK ethical requirements including the FRC Ethical Standard. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is a sufficient and appropriate basis for our opinion.


Going concern

The Accountable Officer has prepared the financial statements on the going concern basis as they have not been informed by the relevant national body of the intention to dissolve the CCG without the transfer of its services to another public sector entity. They have also concluded that there are no material uncertainties that could have cast significant doubt over its ability to continue as a going concern for at least a year from the date of approval of the financial statements (“the going concern period”).

In our evaluation of the Accountable Officer’s conclusions, we considered the inherent risks to the CCG’s operating model and analysed how those risks might affect the CCG’s financial resources or ability to continue operations over the going concern period.

Our conclusions based on this work:

  • we consider that the Accountable Officer’s use of the going concern basis of accounting in the preparation of the financial statements is appropriate;
  • we have not identified, and concur with the Accountable Officer’s assessment that there is not, a material uncertainty related to events or conditions that, individually or collectively, may cast significant doubt on the CCG’s ability to continue as a going concern for the going concern period.

However, as we cannot predict all future events or conditions and as subsequent events may result in outcomes that are inconsistent with judgements that were reasonable at the time they were made, the absence of reference to a material uncertainty in this auditor’s report is not a guarantee that the CCG will continue in operation.


Fraud and breaches of laws and regulations – ability to detect

Identifying and responding to risks of material misstatement due to fraud

To identify risks of material misstatement due to fraud (“fraud risks”) we assessed events or conditions that could indicate an incentive or pressure to commit fraud or provide an opportunity to commit fraud. Our risk assessment procedures included:

  • Enquiring of management, the Audit and Risk Committee and inspection of policy documentation as to the CCG’s high-level policies and procedures to prevent and detect fraud, as well as whether they have knowledge of any actual, suspected or alleged fraud.
  • Assessing the incentives for management to manipulate reported expenditure as a result of the need to achieve statutory targets delegated to the CCG by NHS England.
  • Reading Governing Body and Audit and Risk Committee minutes.
  • Using analytical procedures to identify any usual or unexpected relationships.
  • Reviewing the CCG’s accounting policies.

We communicated identified fraud risks throughout the audit team and remained alert to any indications of fraud throughout the audit.

As required by auditing standards, and taking into account possible pressures to meet delegated statutory resource limits, we performed procedures to address the risk of management override of controls, in particular the risk that CCG management may be in a position to make inappropriate accounting entries.

On this audit we did not identify a fraud risk related to revenue recognition because of the nature of funding provided to the CCG, which is transferred from NHS England and recognised through the Statement of Changes in Taxpayers’ Equity. However, in line with the guidance set out in Practice Note 10 Audit of Financial Statements of Public Sector Bodies in the United Kingdom we recognised a fraud risk related to expenditure recognition.

We did not identify any additional fraud risks.

We performed procedures including:

  • Identifying journal entries to test based on risk criteria and comparing the identified entries to supporting documentation. These included entries made to unrelated accounts linked to the recognition of expenditure and other unusual journal characteristics.
  • Assessing the completeness of disclosed related party transactions and verifying they had been accurately recorded within the financial statements.
  • Reviewing the completeness of information provided by the CCG as part of the ‘NHS Agreement of Balances’ exercise to ensure consistency with the information in the accounts.
  • Assessing the existence and accuracy of recorded expenditure through specific testing over purchases from non-NHS bodies and Non- NHS accruals.
  • Inspecting a sample of invoices received and payments made before and after year end to corroborate whether those items were recorded in the correct accounting period.

Identifying and responding to risks of material misstatement due to non-compliance with laws and regulations

We identified areas of laws and regulations that could reasonably be expected to have a material effect on the financial statements from our general sector experience and through discussion with the directors and other management (as required by auditing standards), the policies and procedures regarding compliance with laws and regulations.

As the CCG is regulated, our assessment of risks involved gaining an understanding of the control environment including the entity’s procedures for complying with regulatory requirements.

We communicated identified laws and regulations throughout our team and remained alert to any indications of non-compliance throughout the audit.

The potential effect of these laws and regulations on the financial statements varies considerably.

The CCG is subject to laws and regulations that directly affect the financial statements including financial reporting legislation. Under the NHS Act 2006, as amended by paragraph 223I1 (3) of Section 27 of the Health and Social Care Act 2012, the CCG must ensure that its revenue resource allocation in any financial year does not exceed the amount specified by NHS England. Expenditure in excess of the amount specified is unlawful.

We assessed the extent of compliance with these laws and regulations as part of our procedures on the related financial statement items and our work on the regularity of expenditure incurred by the CCG in the year of account.

Whilst the CCG is subject to many other laws and regulations, we did not identify any others where the consequences of non-compliance alone could have a material effect on amounts or disclosures in the financial statements.


Context of the ability of the audit to detect fraud or breaches of law or regulation

Owing to the inherent limitations of an audit, there is an unavoidable risk that we may not have detected some material misstatements in the financial statements, even though we have properly planned and performed our audit in accordance with auditing standards. For example, the further removed non-compliance with laws and regulations is from the events and transactions reflected in the financial statements, the less likely the inherently limited procedures required by auditing standards would identify it.

In addition, as with any audit, there remained a higher risk of non-detection of fraud, as these may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal controls. Our audit procedures are designed to detect material misstatement. We are not responsible for preventing non-compliance or fraud and cannot be expected to detect noncompliance with all laws and regulations.


Other information in the Annual Report

The Accountable Officer is responsible for the other information presented in the Annual Report together with the financial statements. Our opinion on the financial statements does not cover the other information and, accordingly, we do not express an audit opinion or, except as explicitly stated below, any form of assurance conclusion thereon.

Our responsibility is to read the other information and, in doing so, consider whether, based on our financial statements audit work, the information therein is materially misstated or inconsistent with the financial statements or our audit knowledge. Based solely on that work:

  • we have not identified material misstatements in the other information; and
  • in our opinion the other information included in the Annual Report for the financial year is consistent with the financial statements.

Annual Governance Statement

We are required to report to you if the Annual Governance Statement has not been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Department of Health and Social Care Group Accounting Manual 2020/21. We have nothing to report in this respect.


Remuneration and Staff Reports

In our opinion the parts of the Remuneration and Staff Reports subject to audit have been properly prepared in accordance with the Department of Health and Social Care Group Accounting Manual 2020/21.


Accountable Officer’s responsibilities

As explained more fully in the statement set out on page 34, the Accountable Officer is responsible for the preparation of financial statements that give a true and fair view. They are also responsible for such internal control as they determine is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; assessing the CCG’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern; and using the going concern basis of accounting unless they have been informed by the relevant national body of the intention to dissolve the CCG without the transfer of its services to another public sector entity.


Auditor’s responsibilities

Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue our opinion in an auditor’s report. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but does not guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with ISAs (UK) will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

A fuller description of our responsibilities is provided on the FRC’s website at www.frc.org.uk/auditorsresponsibilities


Report on other legal and regulatory matters

Opinion on regularity

We are required to report on the following matters under Section 25(1) of the Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014.

In our opinion, in all material respects, the expenditure and income recorded in the financial statements have been applied to the purposes intended by Parliament and the financial transactions conform to the authorities which govern them.


Report on the CCG’s arrangements for securing economy, efficiency and effectiveness in its use of resources

Under the Code of Audit Practice, we are required to report if we identify any significant weaknesses in the arrangements that have been made by the CCG to secure economy, efficiency and effectiveness in its use of resources.

We have nothing to report in this respect.


Respective responsibilities in respect of our review of arrangements for securing economy, efficiency and effectiveness in the use of resources

As explained more fully in the statement set out on page 34, the Accountable Officer is responsible for ensuring that the CCG exercises its functions effectively, efficiently and economically. We are required under section 21(1)(c) of the Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014 to be satisfied that the CCG has made proper arrangements for securing economy, efficiency and effectiveness in its use of resources.

We are not required to consider, nor have we considered, whether all aspects of the CCG’s arrangements for securing economy, efficiency and effectiveness in the use of resources are operating effectively.

We planned our work and undertook our review in accordance with the Code of Audit Practice and related statutory guidance, having regard to whether the CCG had proper arrangements in place to ensure financial sustainability, proper governance and to use information about costs and performance to improve the way it manages and delivers its services. Based on our risk assessment, we undertook such work as we considered necessary.


Statutory reporting matters

We are required by Schedule 2 to the Code of Audit Practice issued by the Comptroller and Auditor General (‘the Code of Audit Practice’) to report to you if we refer a matter to the

Secretary of State and NHS England under section 30 of the Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014 because we have reason to believe that the CCG, or an officer of the CCG, is about to make, or has made, a decision which involves or would involve the body incurring unlawful expenditure, or is about to take, or has begun to take a course of action which, if followed to its conclusion, would be unlawful and likely to cause a loss or deficiency.

We have nothing to report in this respect.


The purpose of our audit work and to whom we owe our responsibilities

This report is made solely to the Members of the Governing Body of NHS Blackpool CCG, as a body, in accordance with Part 5 of the Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014. Our audit work has been undertaken so that we might state to the Members of the Governing Body of the CCG, as a body, those matters we are required to state to them in an auditor’s report and for no other purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not accept or assume responsibility to anyone other than the Members of the Governing Body, as a body, for our audit work, for this report or for the opinions we have formed.


Certificate of completion of the audit

We certify that we have completed the audit of the accounts of NHS Blackpool CCG for the year ended 31 March 2021 in accordance with the requirements of the Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014 and the Code of Audit Practice.

Timothy Cutler for and on behalf of KPMG LLP,
Chartered Accountants
1 St Peter’s Square
Manchester
M2 3AE
24 June 2021

 

Last updated on 29 June 2021 at 09:57 by Senior communications and engagement officer N