NHS still here for you

Health and care bosses across the Fylde Coast are urging people to access urgent care and treatment if they think they need it.

  • If you need medical help you should still contact your GP practice, use NHS 111 online or call 111. If you are told to go to hospital it is important that you go to hospital.
  • We’ll give you the care you need.

As well as being encouraged to seek help for urgent needs, like displaying symptoms of a heart attack or stroke, or you child is unwell, people should also still be using other vital services such as cancer screening and care, maternity appointments and mental health support.

Measures are being taken to reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection at the hospital, including:

  • These include all patients attending appointments being asked whether they have any symptoms on arrival;
  • distancing measures being taken to keep people apart; and
  • hand sanitizers are located by all entrances and are being monitored.

Ignoring problems can have serious consequences – now or in the future.

Dr Jim Gardner, medical director at Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, has an important message below:

 

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Urgent and emergency services

If you need medical help, the NHS is still very much here for you. The way you can access health services at the moment might be slightly different, but if you have symptoms you are concerned about, you must get help as soon as possible.

Staff across the Fylde Coast are working incredibly hard to deal with coronavirus, but they are also working hard to make sure people who don’t have COVID-19 can safely access essential services.

So whether you or a loved one have the symptoms of a heart attack or stroke, are a parent worried about your child or unborn baby, or have concerns about conditions such as cancer you should seek help in the way you always would.

Heart attack patients

  • If you think you or a family member are suffering with the symptoms of a heart attack you must dial 999 immediately.
  • If you or a family member develop symptoms such as heavy or tight chest pain that may spread to your arms, neck or jaw, or make you breathless, sick, sweaty or light-headed and that doesn’t go away, this could be caused by a heart attack. Dial 999 immediately.

Click on the video below for important information for people who may be experiencing symptoms of a heart attack.

Click on the image to view the video
Dr Billal, Lancashire Cardiac Centre

Stroke patients

  • If you think you or a family member are suffering with the symptoms of a stroke you must dial 999 immediately.
  • You can spot the symptoms of a stroke by using the FAST test:
  • Face – is the face drooping / fallen on one side? Can they smile?
  • Arms – can they raise both arms and keep them there?
  • Speech – is it slurred?
  • Time to call 999 if you see any of the above signs

Parents of young children

  • If you are worried about the health of your baby or child, please call 111.
  • If it’s a serious or life-threatening emergency, call 999.
  • Most of the services you usually depend are still available, even though it  might feel different and accessing them might be different to usual.
  • Services for babies, children and young people are still available – at pharmacies, GP practices and at the hospital.
  • It’s really important you recognise that children can become sick really quickly.
  • The hospital is a safe place to being your child if you’re worried.

Click on the video below to hear about child health during the pandemic and how parents can access services for their child.

Click on the image to view the video
Dr Kate Goldberg, consultant pediatrician

Some of the things to look out for in children which might indicate that your child is ill:

  • High temperature
  • Breathing difficulties
  • A rash that won’t go away

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) has produced a useful poster (which Dr Goldberg refers to in her video) for parents and carers advising what to do if a child is unwell or injured during the COVID-19 outbreak.

DOWNLOAD a printable version of the poster here and keep it handy at home

Further information from the RCPCH is available at: www.rcpch.ac.uk/resources/covid-19-resources-parents-carers.

Cancer services

During the COVID-19 pandemic, fewer people are coming forward to talk about symptoms of cancer. Nationally there has been a 70 per cent reduction in referrals of suspected cancer, a number of people are cancelling their appointments when they have been fast tracked for appointments to rule out cancer. The NHS is still open for cancer.

  • If you have a symptom, such as blood, a lump, a new, unusual pain, or a prolonged unexplained symptom, that you are worried about, you must contact your GP practice.
  • Your clinician will discuss with you the benefits of starting or continuing your cancer treatment against the increased risks of contracting coronavirus.
  • If you have been fast tracked by your GP or other health care professional, it is extremely important you take every measure to attend this appointment.
  • Please be assured it is safe to attend the hospital and strict infection prevention and control measures are in place.
  • Early diagnosis saves lives.

Click on the videos below from GPs encouraging people to see their GP if they have any symptoms they are worried about, or attend a fast track appointment if they have been given one.

Click on the image to hear Dr Neil Smith
Dr Neil Smith, GP, Cancer Research UK, regional Cumbria Cancer Alliance
Dr Adam Janjua, Fleetwood GP and cancer lead for the Fylde Coast

Primary care and GP services

Your GP practice is here for you for non-COVID related illnesses and concerns. Where possible you should look to book an appointment online.

When making an appointment you may be asked some questions, these will allow your GP to direct your health need to the correct health care professional. Please be patient.

You may be offered a telephone or video consultation. Please accept this offer if possible as it will mean you do not need to attend the practice.

You must not attend your GP practice without an appointment. If you have symptoms of COVID-19 you must declare this and you will receive the appropriate advice and treatment.

  • If you need medical help from your GP practice, contact them either online, by an app or by phone to be assessed.
  • If you need urgent medical help, use the NHS 111 online service. If you cannot get help online, call 111.
  • If it’s a serious or life-threatening emergency, call 999
  • If you are told to go to hospital it is important that you go to hospital.
  • You should continue to attend your appointments, unless you have been told not to attend.

Prescriptions

  • You can order your repeat prescriptions on the NHS App and through your GP surgery or pharmacy’s online service, where available.
  • If you need to collect a prescription and have coronavirus symptoms or are self-isolating at home – please arrange for a friend, relative or volunteer to collect for you.
  • To help us to keep supplying medicines to everyone who needs them, please only order repeat prescriptions in your usual quantities at the usual time.

You can find out more about ordering prescriptions on our changes to services page.

Maternity services

If you are pregnant it is important that you still attend your antenatal appointments and continue to seek advice from your midwife or maternity team.

If you are worried about your health or the health of your unborn baby, please contact your midwife or maternity team.

If you have recently discovered you’re pregnant, you can self refer into the maternity services by clicking on the link below:

MATERNITY: SELF-REFERRAL

Click on the videos below for important information for mums-to-be , as well as information about the health visiting service, before and after baby is born.

Click on the image to hear Nicola Parry
Nicola Parry, head of midwifery
Click on the image to listen to Sarah Keighley, Health Visitor Team Leader
Sarah Keighley, health visitor team leader

You can find more information on the Healthier Lancashire and South Cumbria website by clicking on the links below:

Immunisations

It is important that you or your baby or child still have routine vaccinations. They protect against serious and potentially deadly illnesses and stop outbreaks in the community.

If the person needing vaccination has coronavirus symptoms or is self-isolating because someone in the household is displaying symptoms, please contact your GP practice for advice.

Mental health

NHS is here to support your mental health during the coronavirus pandemic, as well as your physical health.

  • If you are concerned about the mental health of your child, please contact your GP or check online self-referral options for under 18 years olds at: www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/
  • If you are facing mental health issues contact your GP or key worker, if you have one, and continue to access your mental health services as usual. We are also still open for new referrals, via your GP or online.
  • If you’re experiencing stress and anxiety, you can get further information, including how to self-refer to psychological therapies at: www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/
  • If you are facing a mental health crisis, use the NHS 111 online service. If you cannot get help online, call 111.

Last updated on 13 May 2020 at 13:47 by senior communications and engagement officer